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World-Changing Inventions Showcased at Leonardo

Published: 06/17/2013

By Rachel Madison, Utah Business - Salt Lake City - When it comes to the 101 inventions that changed the world, some are easy to envision, like cellular phones and personal computers. But then there are inventions that don't immediately come to mind-the electric guitar, canned goods and aspirin-that have equally changed the world.

This summer at The Leonardo, an exhibit called "101 Inventions That Changed The World" will be on display, highlighting everything from ancient stone tools to the modern-day space station. The approximately 40-minute show was created by Grande Exhibitions of Victoria, Australia, and is the exhibit's first North American showing.

Rob Kirk, operations director for Grande Exhibitions, said a panel of eight science center CEOs from around the world collated the list of 101 inventions.

"We were very conscious about getting cultural influences from around the world," he said. "We had experts from the U.S., Asia and Europe. They looked at a range of inventions from the dawn of humankind all the way up until now and picked key inventions from those time periods."

The technology used for the multi-sensory show is called SENSORY4 and was created by Grande Exhibitions. It employs 40 screens, 40 high-definition projectors, high-quality surround sound, 6,000 video image files and 2 miles of cable.

"It's a completely different experience from a traditional exhibit because it's a new way to engage in subject matter," Kirk said. "It's a complete sensory experience. In addition to the technology, people can also see a traditional artifact display area with 60 of the inventions on display, augmented reality stations and a LEGO play area for children."

Kirk said one of the goals of the exhibit is to begin discussions among museum goers about the inventions on the list, and why they should or should not be a part of the exhibit.

"We want people to question it and ask why things were included and why they weren't," he said. "It's definitely not a definitive list."

Angelina Kendzior, director of marketing for The Leonardo, said the exhibit will appeal to most Utah residents because the state is so technologically savvy.

"We like to merge science, technology and art," she said. "This show does all of that. Between the music, graphics and the art work, everything in it combines those three elements. It matches The Leonardo's mission."

The exhibit opened Friday, June 14 and will run through Sunday, Sept. 15. The Leonardo is open Sunday through Wednesday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Thursday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. For more information, visit www.theleonardo.org.

When it comes to the 101 inventions that changed the world, some are easy to envision, like cellular phones and personal computers. But then there are inventions that don’t immediately come to mind—the electric guitar, canned goods and aspirin—that have equally changed the world.

This summer at The Leonardo, an exhibit called “101 Inventions That Changed The World” will be on display, highlighting everything from ancient stone tools to the modern-day space station. The approximately 40-minute show was created by Grande Exhibitions of Victoria, Australia, and is the exhibit’s first North American showing.

Rob Kirk, operations director for Grande Exhibitions, said a panel of eight science center CEOs from around the world collated the list of 101 inventions.

“We were very conscious about getting cultural influences from around the world,” he said. “We had experts from the U.S., Asia and Europe. They looked at a range of inventions from the dawn of humankind all the way up until now and picked key inventions from those time periods.”

The technology used for the multi-sensory show is called SENSORY4 and was created by Grande Exhibitions. It employs 40 screens, 40 high-definition projectors, high-quality surround sound, 6,000 video image files and 2 miles of cable.

“It’s a completely different experience from a traditional exhibit because it’s a new way to engage in subject matter,” Kirk said. “It’s a complete sensory experience. In addition to the technology, people can also see a traditional artifact display area with 60 of the inventions on display, augmented reality stations and a LEGO play area for children.”

Kirk said one of the goals of the exhibit is to begin discussions among museum goers about the inventions on the list, and why they should or should not be a part of the exhibit.

“We want people to question it and ask why things were included and why they weren’t,” he said. “It’s definitely not a definitive list.”

Angelina Kendzior, director of marketing for The Leonardo, said the exhibit will appeal to most Utah residents because the state is so technologically savvy.

“We like to merge science, technology and art,” she said. “This show does all of that. Between the music, graphics and the art work, everything in it combines those three elements. It matches The Leonardo’s mission.”

The exhibit opened Friday, June 14 and will run through Sunday, Sept. 15. The Leonardo is open Sunday through Wednesday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Thursday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. For more information, visit www.theleonardo.org.

The “101 Inventions That Changed The World” are:

- See more at: http://www.utahbusiness.com/articles/view/world_changing_inventions_showcased_at_leonardo#sthash.25jMJLRl.dpuf

When it comes to the 101 inventions that changed the world, some are easy to envision, like cellular phones and personal computers. But then there are inventions that don’t immediately come to mind—the electric guitar, canned goods and aspirin—that have equally changed the world.

This summer at The Leonardo, an exhibit called “101 Inventions That Changed The World” will be on display, highlighting everything from ancient stone tools to the modern-day space station. The approximately 40-minute show was created by Grande Exhibitions of Victoria, Australia, and is the exhibit’s first North American showing.

Rob Kirk, operations director for Grande Exhibitions, said a panel of eight science center CEOs from around the world collated the list of 101 inventions.

“We were very conscious about getting cultural influences from around the world,” he said. “We had experts from the U.S., Asia and Europe. They looked at a range of inventions from the dawn of humankind all the way up until now and picked key inventions from those time periods.”

The technology used for the multi-sensory show is called SENSORY4 and was created by Grande Exhibitions. It employs 40 screens, 40 high-definition projectors, high-quality surround sound, 6,000 video image files and 2 miles of cable.

“It’s a completely different experience from a traditional exhibit because it’s a new way to engage in subject matter,” Kirk said. “It’s a complete sensory experience. In addition to the technology, people can also see a traditional artifact display area with 60 of the inventions on display, augmented reality stations and a LEGO play area for children.”

Kirk said one of the goals of the exhibit is to begin discussions among museum goers about the inventions on the list, and why they should or should not be a part of the exhibit.

“We want people to question it and ask why things were included and why they weren’t,” he said. “It’s definitely not a definitive list.”

Angelina Kendzior, director of marketing for The Leonardo, said the exhibit will appeal to most Utah residents because the state is so technologically savvy.

“We like to merge science, technology and art,” she said. “This show does all of that. Between the music, graphics and the art work, everything in it combines those three elements. It matches The Leonardo’s mission.”

The exhibit opened Friday, June 14 and will run through Sunday, Sept. 15. The Leonardo is open Sunday through Wednesday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Thursday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. For more information, visit www.theleonardo.org.

The “101 Inventions That Changed The World” are:

- See more at: http://www.utahbusiness.com/articles/view/world_changing_inventions_showcased_at_leonardo#sthash.25jMJLRl.dpuf

When it comes to the 101 inventions that changed the world, some are easy to envision, like cellular phones and personal computers. But then there are inventions that don’t immediately come to mind—the electric guitar, canned goods and aspirin—that have equally changed the world.

This summer at The Leonardo, an exhibit called “101 Inventions That Changed The World” will be on display, highlighting everything from ancient stone tools to the modern-day space station. The approximately 40-minute show was created by Grande Exhibitions of Victoria, Australia, and is the exhibit’s first North American showing.

Rob Kirk, operations director for Grande Exhibitions, said a panel of eight science center CEOs from around the world collated the list of 101 inventions.

“We were very conscious about getting cultural influences from around the world,” he said. “We had experts from the U.S., Asia and Europe. They looked at a range of inventions from the dawn of humankind all the way up until now and picked key inventions from those time periods.”

The technology used for the multi-sensory show is called SENSORY4 and was created by Grande Exhibitions. It employs 40 screens, 40 high-definition projectors, high-quality surround sound, 6,000 video image files and 2 miles of cable.

“It’s a completely different experience from a traditional exhibit because it’s a new way to engage in subject matter,” Kirk said. “It’s a complete sensory experience. In addition to the technology, people can also see a traditional artifact display area with 60 of the inventions on display, augmented reality stations and a LEGO play area for children.”

Kirk said one of the goals of the exhibit is to begin discussions among museum goers about the inventions on the list, and why they should or should not be a part of the exhibit.

“We want people to question it and ask why things were included and why they weren’t,” he said. “It’s definitely not a definitive list.”

Angelina Kendzior, director of marketing for The Leonardo, said the exhibit will appeal to most Utah residents because the state is so technologically savvy.

“We like to merge science, technology and art,” she said. “This show does all of that. Between the music, graphics and the art work, everything in it combines those three elements. It matches The Leonardo’s mission.”

The exhibit opened Friday, June 14 and will run through Sunday, Sept. 15. The Leonardo is open Sunday through Wednesday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Thursday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. For more information, visit www.theleonardo.org.

The “101 Inventions That Changed The World” are:

- See more at: http://www.utahbusiness.com/articles/view/world_changing_inventions_showcased_at_leonardo#sthash.25jMJLRl.dpuf

When it comes to the 101 inventions that changed the world, some are easy to envision, like cellular phones and personal computers. But then there are inventions that don’t immediately come to mind—the electric guitar, canned goods and aspirin—that have equally changed the world.

This summer at The Leonardo, an exhibit called “101 Inventions That Changed The World” will be on display, highlighting everything from ancient stone tools to the modern-day space station. The approximately 40-minute show was created by Grande Exhibitions of Victoria, Australia, and is the exhibit’s first North American showing.

Rob Kirk, operations director for Grande Exhibitions, said a panel of eight science center CEOs from around the world collated the list of 101 inventions.

“We were very conscious about getting cultural influences from around the world,” he said. “We had experts from the U.S., Asia and Europe. They looked at a range of inventions from the dawn of humankind all the way up until now and picked key inventions from those time periods.”

The technology used for the multi-sensory show is called SENSORY4 and was created by Grande Exhibitions. It employs 40 screens, 40 high-definition projectors, high-quality surround sound, 6,000 video image files and 2 miles of cable.

“It’s a completely different experience from a traditional exhibit because it’s a new way to engage in subject matter,” Kirk said. “It’s a complete sensory experience. In addition to the technology, people can also see a traditional artifact display area with 60 of the inventions on display, augmented reality stations and a LEGO play area for children.”

Kirk said one of the goals of the exhibit is to begin discussions among museum goers about the inventions on the list, and why they should or should not be a part of the exhibit.

“We want people to question it and ask why things were included and why they weren’t,” he said. “It’s definitely not a definitive list.”

Angelina Kendzior, director of marketing for The Leonardo, said the exhibit will appeal to most Utah residents because the state is so technologically savvy.

“We like to merge science, technology and art,” she said. “This show does all of that. Between the music, graphics and the art work, everything in it combines those three elements. It matches The Leonardo’s mission.”

The exhibit opened Friday, June 14 and will run through Sunday, Sept. 15. The Leonardo is open Sunday through Wednesday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Thursday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. For more information, visit www.theleonardo.org.

The “101 Inventions That Changed The World” are:

- See more at: http://www.utahbusiness.com/articles/view/world_changing_inventions_showcased_at_leonardo#sthash.25jMJLRl.dpuf
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