SpotlightSalt Lake City

 
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Apr 24
Utah Whitewater Film Festival

This will be the 14th annual whitewater film festival. All the money raised will go to the Snake River Fund, www.snakeriverfund.org. We will have both a raffle and a silent auction.

Apr 24
Life at the Speed of Light

 J. Craig Venter, Ph.D., is Founder, Chairman, and CEO of the J. Craig Venter Institute (JVCI), a not-for-profit, research organization dedicated to human, microbial, plant, synthetic and environmental research. He is also Co-Founder and CEO of Synthetic Genomics Inc. (SGI), a privately-held company dedicated to commercializing genomic-driven solutions to address global needs. In 1998, Dr. Venter founded Celera Genomics to sequence the human genome using new tools and techniques he and his team developed. This research culminated with the February 2001 publication of the human genome in the journal, Science. Dr. Venter and his team at JVCI continue to blaze new trails in genomics. They have sequenced and analyzed hundreds of genomes and created the first self-replicating bacterial cell constructed with synthetic DNA.

In 2010, Dr. Venter and his team at the JCVI successfully constructed the first "synthetic bacterial cell" putting humankind at the threshold of a new phase of biological research, one that is enabling us to go from reading the genetic code (sequencing genomes) to now writing the genetic code for designing new species. The science of synthetic genomics will have a profound impact on society, including new methods for chemical and energy production, human health and medical advances, clean water, and new food and nutritional products. Dr. Venter, regarded as one of the leading scientists of the 21st century for his numerous pioneering advances in genomics, will guide us through this emerging field, detailing its origins, current challenges, and the potential positive advances.

Dr. Venter is a pioneer of the genomics revolution. His work on synthetic biology truly embodies the theme of “pushing the boundaries of life.” Essentially, Venter is seeking to “write the software of life” to create microbes designed by humans rather than only through evolution. The potential benefits and risks of this new technology are enormous. It also requires us to examine, both scientifically and philosophically, the question of “What is life?”

Apr 22
War Horse

“War Horse” tells the story of young Albert’s beloved horse, Joey, which has been sold to the cavalry and shipped to France. In a tale that the Sunday Express said is “…both epic and intimate,” and “absolutely guaranteed to move the heart,” Joey is caught in enemy crossfire and ends up serving both sides of the war before landing in no man’s land. Albert, not old enough to enlist, embarks on a treacherous mission to find his horse and bring him home. What follows is a remarkable tale of courage, loyalty and friendship.

“War Horse” is filled with stirring music and songs, and at the heart of the show are life-sized puppets which bring breathing, galloping, charging horses to life on stage. “The puppetry is nothing short of miraculous,” according to The Times of London.

Apr 24
Peter Pan

Fly away with Peter, Wendy, Tinkerbell, and Captain Hook as J.M. Barrie's magical, musical fairytale of the "Boy Who Wouldn't Grow Up" is cleverly re-imagined for the Hale Center Theater Orem stage! A favorite for children of all ages. Come back to Neverland, and remember what it's like to pretend!

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Utah Tops Forbes 2012 List Of The Best States For Business

Published: 12/13/2012

by Kurt Badenhausen, Forbes Magazine

Utah is Forbes’ Best State for Business for a third straight year. The state has a pro-business climate and companies benefit from energy costs that are 29% below the national average. Utah’s economy has expanded at 2.3% a year over the past five years—fifth best in the U.S. Utah is well known for its winter activities and has seen an increase in tourism since the 2002 Winter Olympics.

...Utah heads our list of the Best States for Business for a third straight year. Utah’s economy has expanded 2.3% annually since 2006–fifth best in the U.S–versus 0.5% for the nation as a whole. “We have a very fertile environment for entrepreneurs and business,” says Gov. Gary Herbert, who was reelected last month in a 68%-28% landslide.

Herbert cites three areas where Utah has a competitive advantage: taxes, its labor force and a favorable regulatory climate. Utah’s 5% flat corporate tax rate is one of the lowest in the country. The Tax Foundation, which released a study in February that measures the tax burdens in each state across different industries, rated Utah sixth best for existing firms. (It ranked No. 10 for new firms.)

Utah has a young, vibrant workforce. The state’s median age of 29 is four years less than the next youngest state, Texas. A third of the state’s workforce is bilingual, according to the Economic Development Corporation of Utah. This is largely a result of the state’s large population of Mormons, many of whom spend time as missionaries overseas. It is an attractive benefit for companies in an increasingly global economy and has helped lure large U.S. companies with international operations like eBay, Goldman Sachs, Oracle and Procter & Gamble. Goldman Sachs’ Salt Lake City office is its second biggest in the Americas with more than 1,400 employees. Utah has doubled its international trade over the past five years and this year it is up nearly 40%.

Utah ranks third for regulatory climate in the Mercatus Center’s Freedom in the 50 States study–a new metric in our Best States study. “Utah is less likely to reward frivolous lawsuits or hand out excessive judgments,” says Jason Sorens, who co-authored the report. “Utah’s health insurance regulations are generally light, resulting in less costly policies and more choice for people in the small group and individual markets.”

Last year, Gov. Herbert initiated a review of the state’s nearly 2,000 administrative rules. The state eliminated or modified 368 of them that Herbert characterized as “a drag on the economy.”

Among the other pluses for Utah: energy costs that are 29% below the national average. It is also one of only seven states to maintain an Aaa bond rating from the three rating agencies–something the U.S. lost last year. Herbert’s motto: “Government should get off of your backs and out of your wallets.”

Our ranking is based on six vital factors for businesses: costs, labor supply, regulatory environment, current economic climate, growth prospects and quality of life. We weighed 35 points of data to determine the ranks in the six main areas. Business costs, which include labor, energy and taxes, are weighted the most heavily. We relied on 10 data sources; research firm Moody’s Analytics was the most-utilized resource (click here for a detailed methodology).

Click to read the full article...

 

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