Salt Lake News & Updates

Spotlight
 
advertisement
 
advertisement

 

Dec 2 - Dec 3
Beethoven and Rachmaninoff
Now here are two composers who knew how to go big. Enjoy the Ut...
Dec 1 - Dec 3
Sinbad
Ranked by Comedy Central as one of the “100 Greatest Standups o...
Dec 3
Utah Jazz vs. Denver Nuggets
The Utah Jazz host the Denver Nuggets for this NBA basketball g...
Dec 1 - Dec 3
Christkindlmarkt
Inspired by the world famous German Christmas markets, Christki...
Dec 9 - Dec 10
Utah Grizzlies vs. Rapid City Rush
Watch the Utah Grizzlies take on the Rapid City Rush on home ic...
Dec 2 - Dec 26
The Nutcracker
No holiday season is complete without the festive cheer of The ...
View All Events

The most (and least) livable states - No. 1: Utah

Published: 08/31/2012
MSN Money -- Roadmap to the future... States are regularly ranked on things like jobs, health, schools, taxes and water quality. But how do they compare on the future? A recent report from the Gallup polling organization compared "the future livability" of each state. And Utah ranked #1.

The report is based on surveys conducted over 18 months that measured sentiment on 13 metrics that gauge future livability. Some of the questions were meant to shed light on personal-finance matters like job prospects, while others aimed to get a handle on more ephemeral quality-of-life issues. Among the latter, we asked for residents' outlook on life five years from now and ranked the results.

To better understand the polling results, the website 24/7 Wall St. called Dan Witters, research director for the Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index, and asked how Gallup chose the components of the future livability score. The survey, he said, sought to isolate factors that increase the probability that a locale will have improved economic vitality down the road.

"If you have high economic confidence and strong job creation and high full employment, does that guarantee that you will (have the same) 20 years from now? No, obviously not," Witters said. But they are predictive.

The health factors Gallup considered, for instance (obesity, smoking and frequency of dentist visits), have long-term consequences. Obesity is one of the best predictors of diabetes, according to Witters, who noted that states with high obesity, including West Virginia, Mississippi and Kentucky, "the probability that you're going to have high levels of high blood pressure, high levels of cholesterol, high levels of physical pain" is increased.

Similarly, the wealth of a state's population is taken as an indicator of the future livability -- eight of the 10 states with the worst future livability scores are in the bottom third for median income.
0