Salt Lake News & Updates

 
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Dec 19
So You Think You Can Dance Live

So You Think You Can Dance Live, the 11-time Primetime Emmy Award-winning show that sparked America’s fascination with dance, is set to captivate audiences again – live on tour – with more stops than ever before.

Celebrating its momentous 11th season, So You Think You Can Dance Live’s Top 10 finalists make their way across North America, performing in more than 70 cities

The Season 11 tour lineup includes the following Top 10 finalists: Bridget Whitman, Casey Askew, Emilio Dosal, Jacque LeWarne, Jessica Richens, Ricky Ubeda, Rudy Abreu, Tanisha Belnap, Valerie Rockey and Zack Everhart

Dec 19
21st Annual Winter Solstice Celebration Concert

This is the 21st year of an annual Winter Solstice Celebration Concert held at and sponsored by the Cathedral Church of St. Mark. Special Guest aritst is Peggie Perkins a past Grammy nominated singer from Los Angeles. Other guest performers include Corey Christiansen, Jack Wood, Curtis Woodbury, Larry Jackstien, Jay Lawrence and Lars Yorgason.  

Dec 21
Santa Sunday

First 100 people dressed in a complete Santa Claus suit ski free and access a special Tram at 10:15 a.m.

Register at the Activity Center from 9 a.m. - 10 a.m. and meet outside the Activity Center at 10:15 a.m. to be escorted to a special Santa Express Tram.

Full outfits must include a white beard or wig, traditional red jacket with white trim and belt and red pants.
 

Dec 20 - Dec 23
Marry Christmas

This season's Script-In-Hand Series is something special for the holidays: Marry Christmas!  Celebrate the first anniversary of marriage equality with us as we share real-life marriage stories.  All proceeds benefit Restore Our Humanity.  Cast TBA, directed by Jason Bowcutt.

Dec 24
Christmas Eve Torchlight Parade and Fireworks

Join us at dusk on the Plaza Deck for bonfires, the Torchlight Parade, and a great fireworks display. At the end, Santa Claus will rappel out of the Tram to say hello to the kids!

In the Snowbird Center, there will also be a Christmas Eve Candlelight Service.

Dec 5 - Dec 27
A Year with Frog and Toad

SLAC believes in the power of the arts to enhance children’s literacy, educational performance and interest in learning. A Year with Frog and Toad will include eight free matinee performances for over 1,400 Title I schoolchildren. As school curriculums continue to narrow at the expense of the arts, SLAC’s free performances provide a live theatrical experience to academically at-risk schoolchildren who often lack access to opportunities as basic as field trips and arts exposure. SLAC will also offer discounted performances for non-Title I schools; literary partnerships with the Salt Lake City Public Library and local bookstores; an online study guide available for schools and students as they prepare for their visits; and collaborations with local organizations and sponsors.

Dec 29 - Dec 31
EVE Winter Fest

Salt Lake City comes to life with EVE Winter Fest, a three-day celebration with concerts, DJs, grown-up drinks and engaging activities for kids and families. Discover everything that downtown has to offer with one all-access pass. With twelve venues and over 100 individual events, Eve Winter Fest is jam packed with fun for everyone. Cheer on the Utah Jazz against the Minnesota Timberwolves, skate under the lights at The Gallivan Center, or learn about the universe at the Clark Planetarium Hansen Dome. Plus, all of your family favorites such as Bounce Town, Ball Room, and HoopDeDoo are back. Ring in the new year with music from Fictionist, a VIP party at UMOCA and the USA's largest disco ball.

Dec 5 - Dec 31
The Nutcracker

The New York Times critic called it “one of the best productions I’ve ever seen.” You’ll call it pure entertainment and a wonderful holiday experience. Join Clara, her magical nutcracker prince and exotic characters from around the world, for the 59th edition of William Christiansen’s The Nutcracker and see why this is the longest-running full production in America.

Dec 31 - Jan 1
EVE Hops and Spirits VIP Experience

New this year as part of the EVE Winter Fest is the VIP Experience at the Utah Museum of Contemporary Art. This immersive 21-and-older event features locally made Epic Brewery, Jack Rabbit Gin, Vida Tequila, Five Wives Vodka and savory appetizers, all in a setting of spontaneous performances with beats provided by SLC’s finest, DJ Jesse Walker.

Jan 2
Utah Jazz vs Atlanta Hawks

Come see the Utah Jazz as they take on the Atlanta Hawks.

Jan 1 - Jan 3
Holiday Carnival and Expo

Carnival with rides, games, food, laser tag, climbing wall, dunking booth to dunk elves, Santa and others in fake snow, giant "Giving Tree" with donations and proceeds from the event to go to Reach the Children USA; and exhibit booths (home improvement, boutique, health and wellness and others).

Jan 9
Nico and Vinz

See Scandinavian music sensation Nico and Vinz live  at the UCCU Center!

Jan 9
Randy Rogers Band

The State Room presents a night of country with the Randy Rogers Band at The Depot.

Jan 11
Richard Elliott and Tony Arnold

Celebrated soprano Tony Arnold returns to NOVA for Messiaen’s poignant song cycle,Harawi. The first half of this event features the Choristers of the Madeleine Choir School singing Gregorian Chant and Mormon Tabernacle organist Richard Elliot performing Bach’s Passacaglia and Fugue in C minor

Jan 15
Debussy Francaix Poulenc Ibert

The Utah Symphony presents a program comprised of music of Debussy, Francaix, Poulenc and Ibert.

Jan 16
Utah Jazz vs Los Angeles Lakers

Come see the Utah Jazz as they take on the Los Angeles Lakers.

Jan 23 - Jan 24
Utah Grizzlies vs Bakersfield Condors

Come see the Utah Grizzlies as they battle the Bakersfield Condors.

Jan 26
Utah Jazz vs Boston Celtics

Come see the Utah Jazz as they take on the Boston Celtics. 

Jan 27
Particle

Particle is a jam band formed in Los Angeles in 2000. The current lineup includes Steve Molitz (keyboard), Eric Gould (bass), Darren Pujalet (drums) and Ben Combe (guitar). The music of Particle can be characterized as a combination of rock and roll, electronica and funk. Particle is currently recording their sophomore studio effort with producer Steve Goldman and engineer Marc Johnson to be released in 2007.

Jan 28
Utah Jazz vs Los Angeles Clippers

Come see the Utah Jazz as they take on the Los Angeles Clippers.

Jan 30 - Jan 31
Flabbergast

Re-flabbergastation!

Back by popular demand is the return of Flabbergast, our SHOW FOR ALL AGES. Created by circus director and choreographer Tandy Beal with original music by Jon Scoville, this piece takes a magical and mystery filled tour through time and space and immerses audiences in a journey of wonder. The program will also include the return of fan favorite, You and the Space Between, by Miguel Azcue, a Ririe-Woodbury alum now based in Sweden. This work will challenge your notion of time and space and provide a playful and mesmerizing experience.

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Powder Up in Utah

Published: 01/28/2013

By Elisabeth Vincentelli, New York Post

For many skiing New Yorkers, an expedition to the slopes involves a major decision: north or west?

Most of those who pass on the long drive to Vermont end up flying to Colorado. But here’s the thing: If you’re going to get on a plane, you might as well head to Utah. The resorts around Salt Lake City compensate for the pricier airfare (about $350 on average for a nonstop vs. $200 to Denver) and the extra hour in the air with fantastic snow in fantastic quantities — minus the lift lines that plague Colorado’s Vail and Breckenridge.

Rather than glitzy Park City — the third-priciest North American ski town, according to TripAdvisor — you should head to the smaller Cottonwood Canyon resorts, all within 35 minutes of the Salt Lake City airport. That part of the Wasatch Range gets more of the fluffy white stuff without the prices and crowds, and each locale has a distinct identity: There’s truly one for everyone.

Alta

Best for: Ski purists

True to unassuming form, this family-run resort recently celebrated its 75th anniversary with a special-edition beer and a homey torchlight parade. Tucked in at the end of Little Cottonwood Canyon Road, Alta (alta.com) just doesn’t care about showing off. A day pass maxes out at $75 ($99 for an Alta/Snowbird combo), and people go there not to flash fancy outfits but to ski — and ski only. Snowboarders are off-limits. Alta’s vertical drop is only about 2,000 feet, but the varied terrain includes everything from chutes to bowls. With an average of 560 inches of prime powder a year, the place is a magnet for hardy enthusiasts who don’t mind the occasional traverse to claim first tracks.

Despite its reputation as a hard-core skiing paradise — a local nickname is “steep and cheap” — Alta actually is a good place to learn. Beginners should start off at the Albion Base, which accesses the resort’s eight green runs and hosts the excellent ski school’s main office.

Snowbird

Best for: Steeps hounds

A mile down from Alta, with which it shares a boundary, Snowbird (snowbird.com) means business, on and off the slopes. Some people say it’s suitable for beginners, but the truth is that the Bird rewards confident skiers and riders. Officially 38 percent of the 100 runs are blue, but some of them make East Coast black diamonds look puny.

As for Snowbird’s black diamonds (and double-blacks), they can turn an expert’s knees to jelly. I’ve been skiing for more than three decades and experienced one of my most memorable crashes ever on the black Tiger Tail in January. We’ll meet again, Tiger Tail!

As for the double-blacks, they can turn an expert’s knees to jelly.

A big attraction at Snowbird is the 125-passenger tram, which climbs 2,900 vertical feet in eight minutes. Show up early on pow mornings, when the line can snake out the building. For all this, a day pass is $85; a bargain compared to Vail’s $109.

Snowbird opened in 1971 and was developed by Texas gazillionaire Dick Bass. It offers a wider range of accommodations, dining and services than its Little Cottonwood neighbor — if you want to chase a day of steep chutes with a $130 herbal wrap, Snowbird has you covered.

Solitude

Best for: Beginners and intermediates looking to build confidence

Talk about self-fulfilling prophecy: Solitude (skisolitude.com) is empty. Even on a weekend, lines are unknown, so you can gun down without fearing encounters of the close or even not-so-close kind. And because there aren’t any lines, you can get right back up the hill without pausing and make the most of the $72 lift ticket.

The grooming here is so smooth that you can just focus on your turns without worrying about hitting a hard patch. Go on, bust a move — nobody will see you fall!

The spectacular Honeycomb Canyon area offers a backcountry feel without the exhausting hiking since it’s accessible from the Summit chair. And the resort features the region’s finest nordic skiing, with more than 12 miles of trails and regular workshops and clinics.

Just off Big Cottonwood Canyon Road, Solitude’s main base has successfully recreated the intimate feel of a European Alpine village, complete with a clock tower and a central ice rink. How this gem of a resort remains under the radar is a mystery.

Brighton

Best for: Snowboarders

Brighton (brightonresort.com) claims to be “where Utah learns to ski and snowboard”— emphasis on the latter. Three miles from quiet Solitude, this rowdy hangout has chosen to focus on young riders. Catering mostly to locals, who dig the cheap lift tickets ($71 for a “SuperDay” running from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.) and laid-back vibe, Brighton feels like Utah’s answer to a Californian surf town.

Brighton is a good place for families trying to accommodate the diverging needs of skiers and boarders. The resort has spectacular scenery, and many of its 66 beautiful runs snake through glades. But the real draws are the six terrain parks, which include a variety of rails, jibs and ramps, as well as a large half-pipe. By the end of the day, everybody can agree on the awesome nachos at Molly Green’s, a great A-frame bar and grill conveniently located between the slopes and the parking lot.

Where to stay

If you want to stay slopeside, go for one of Alta’s revered lodges. They aren’t cheap, but most rates include breakfast and dinner, and everything you need is either on-site or within walking distance so you don’t need a car. (The lodge can help book an airport shuttle, $72 per person round-trip.)

The mothership is the Alta Lodge, open since 1939 (double room from $491 in high season, bed in dorm room from $148, altalodge.com). Linked to the Wildcat Base by a tow rope, the cozy lodge is so popular that many guests book their next stay when they check out.

If you want to keep your skiing options open or need some nightlife, the Monaco in downtown Salt Lake City is an easy 40-minute commute to the Cottonwood Canyons (double room from $229, monaco-saltlakecity.com). This Kimpton property balances understated chic with swoon-worthy comfort, and its restaurant, Bambara, is among the finest in SLC. The hotel is across the street from the Capitol Theater, which hosts the local Ballet West as well as plays and concerts, and a 15-minute walk from the Utah Jazz’s home arena.

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